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Yes, it's true...standardized tests are a pain in the butt! However, your score on these exams will play a large role in the college admissions process. The key to performing well on the SAT is being adequately prepared. You just have to pick the best study method for you. In this article, we'll discuss some SAT tips that will get you prepared for the big exam day.
First, you should take the PSAT or preliminary SAT. This exam is essentially an SAT pre-test. You'll be placed in a real live testing environment and the questions on this exam will be very similar to the ones that you'll receive on the real SAT exam. Similar to the SAT, the PSAT will include the following subject areas: reading, math, and writing.

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Colleges won't be taking your PSAT score into consideration when evaluating whether or not they should accept you, but it is in your best interest to take this exam seriously. In addition to helping you prepare for the real SAT, this exam will also qualify you for the National Merit Scholarship program. What's the National Merit Scholarship Program? This program awards scholarships to students who earn the highest scores on the PSAT. You can learn more about this process by visiting the National Merit Scholarship Corporation's website.
Second, you should continue to prepare for the SAT exam after you have taken the PSAT. There are a lot of various resources available, including live SAT prep course classes, free online resources, and books that you can purchase from your local bookstore. The method of study that each student selects will vary based on their learning style. As for live courses, some schools may offer these for free. If not, the following companies offer live SAT prep courses: Kaplan, The Princeton Review, and Sylvan Learning Center. You should visit their websites to find out more information about specific prep courses that are being offered in your area. In addition, there are a lot of free online resources. You can download free practice questions on the College Board website. Lastly, you can also head down to your local bookstore and ask the people behind the counter to point you in the direction of SAT review materials. I can guarantee that there is a section committed to standardized exams. If you purchase your own book, you can create your own study plan as opposed to being committed to attending a live class on specific dates and times.
You can register for the exam on the College Board website. It's a good idea to pick your exam date a couple months in advance of the application deadlines for the colleges that you intend on applying to. If you follow these SAT tips, you'll feel confident and ready to go when exam day rolls around. Remember to get enough sleep the night before the exam and to each breakfast on the morning before the exam. Good luck!

2 comments

W said... @ August 10, 2011 at 2:07 AM

W

wrapping machine said... @ August 10, 2011 at 2:08 AM

Thanks for the tips. SAT and PSAT are rather annoying because they don't actually reflect your ability to understand, but to memorize, and that's why I would vote to change the entire system.

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